Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Chapter Eleven -- KA model K-5A


CHAPTER ELEVEN

KITCHENAID MODEL K-5A MIXER

 

 

 

 

 

 

1941 On the eve of World War II, model K5A was introduced. It replaced the KA model G 5qt narrow bowl mixer. It has remained virtually unchanged until 1978 when the KSS series replaced it.


The earliest K5-A mixers had he plain bands with nothing behind the speed control. I think it was in 1962 they went from the brass band with the engraved script logo to the screen-printed block logo. They had the Hobart name, but no shield on the name band. The latest K5-A's from the 1970's had the Hobart name in their logo shield on the band behind the speed control switch.

There is no way to pin down a date from the serial number of newer K5-A's. The engraved band with the serial number was discontinued in 1962 about the same time that stainless steel bowls were added.

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Bowl style changes

1941 Bowls are 5qt tinned metal with handle flanges and open lip edge like the Model G bowls.

The first stainless steel bowls have the handle flanges and the open lip edge.

On later editions of the K-5A, the bowl flange handles were removed but the open lip edge remained.

Still later editions of the bowl have rolled top edges rather than the open lip design for home use [open lip bowls continued to be made for commercial models for sanitary reasons].

 

 

 

Beater style changes


Notice the slight changes in design of the beaters. They are smaller than the G model beaters also.

The flat beaters have few strips in the grid and the tinned wire whip has fewer wires than the whip designed for the G model.

Also note the dough hook has a flat cap top now. The dough hook will undergo a few slight changes over the years to come.

Later beaters had the white plastic dishwasher safe coating, leaving only the commercial models with burnished aluminum beaters.


 

 

Old attachments continued with the K-5A according to my manual

Pea Sheller
Aluminum Bowl Splash guard
Aluminum bowl chute
meat grinder
aluminum sausage stuffer
Water jacket - now made in stainless steel
oil dropper
Can Opener -- with slight revisions


Colander & Sieve

This style is shown in an early K5-A manual I have and has slight changes. The biggest difference is that a wood paddle replaced the ceramic rollers. The shape of the bowl is a little different as well. It uses the water jacket attachment to catch the juice that comes through the colander. 



Pelican head slicer
glass citrus juicer
Knife Sharpener
Silver Buffer
Cast Aluminum Rotary Slicer and Shredder

This new version Comes One Fine and One Coarse Grating Cone, plus One Thick and One Thin Slicing Cone. These cones replaced the drum style slicers in the old version.


2qt wood ice cream maker replaced 3 qt ice cream maker

Post-war versions of the attachment (that went with the K5-A, K4-B, 3C, 4C, and so on) lack the indicator and were first made with both wood buckets. If I recall correctly, the wood-bucket units were made in two sizes. At some point the wood bucket was replaced with the green fiberglass unit, which came with a reversible stand that allowed use on either of KA's mixer offerings (tilt head or bowl lift).






INSTRUCTION MANUAL

 

 





Production of KA stand mixers were limited due to WWII.

All three Arens-designed mixers are virtually unchanged today. They appear in many museums and have won awards for outstanding design.



There is no official information on the age of K-5A's, but I have tried to compare serial numbers with known dates when I can.


One appeared on eBay several years ago that matched serial number 5B12599 to December 1941 with a photo of the original receipt. I would hazard a guess that yours is also from the 1940's.

There is no way to pin down a date from the serial number of newer K5-A's. The engraved band with the serial number was discontinued in 1962 about the same time that stainless steel bowls were added. They were discontinued in 1978 when the mixer became the K5SS.

The latest K5-A's from the 1970's had the Hobart name in their logo shield on the band behind the speed control switch. Early models had the Hobart name, but no shield. Still earlier were the plain bands with nothing behind the speed control.



K5A that was a wedding present in Dec. of 1941 serial number 5812599. 


One bought it in 1948 serial # 5B17687

K5-A, #5B10252, which was purchased new in the Mid 40's

 

 

The original K5-A came with a tinned bowl and had an etched or engraved trim band that is probably made of brass. The serial number is stamped on the trim band and many start with 5BXXXXX. The logo type is quite a bit different from that found on later mixers. The print is a bit less of a Block and the “K”, “h”, and “A” are quite stylized when compared to later and modern logos.

Some time in the late 1950’s or more likely the early 1960’s stainless steel bowls became standard, the logo was changed and the band became screen printed instead of etched. The serial number is not stamped on band of this generation of K-5A’s. I assume that it is stuck under the mixer base like current mixers are.

Later K5-A’s came with coated tools and somewhere in its evolution the gray/brown cord became white. It continued until the late 1970’s when it KitchenAid mixers added a solid state speed control and the K5SS was introduced.


Before the 70s the power cords were gray or brown, but afterwards were white.




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24 comments:

  1. I am glad I found your blog, I am inheriting a K5-A mixer from my late Grandmother and I am just looking for information on how old it might be and what kind of attachments I might be able to buy for it. It currently has these attachments the grain mill, rotary slicer and shredder,and meat grinder. Can you tell me if I can still get attachments for my model?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Any of the Hub attachments sold today will fit your model. What a lovely item to remind you of grandma!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was wondering if you have a copy of the K5-A service manual from Hobart?

    ReplyDelete
  4. We just bought one off Craig's List.. a score for $120 w/ all attachments K5A ; Based on this sites info ~circa 1963 to 1968. As GE fav asked any service manuals available?

    ReplyDelete
  5. No guys! I don't have a service manual.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I bought a K5-A off ebay last week. The previous older rarely cleaned it so I am cleaning years of grease and dirt off of it. Seems to work okay but I need to re-grease it.

    You have given me great information about the possible age of the unit. Its serial number is 5B29691. Based on what you wrote, would it be a fair guess that it is from the late '50s?

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  7. While doing a search online for some attachments for my K5-A I located a manual at www.kitchenaid.com/customer-service/manuals. I was able to download it for free. Hope this helps.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi,
    I have an one K5A that was of my grandmother who lived in Canada, I think it comes from '70s.
    Serial number 5B49196. I would like to have some info and advice about maintenanace or a exploded view in order to open for eventual check/repairs? Inside it looks in good conditions but not the external main power cable that I would like to replace. Furthermore here in Italy we have 220V 50hz I think a transformer is necessary ( this item has been lost..) Pls advice . Ciao Riccardo

    ReplyDelete
  9. greetings, I saw one recently where the stamped serial number started with 5A and not 5B, does that make it older?
    thanks for your great site

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks for the great information.

    I just purchased an old K5-A which I believed to be a fairly early one, however, the high serial number of 5B-60778 might indicate otherwise.

    It has the old-style trim band with early KitchenAid logo and stamped serial number, burnished aluminum beaters, and the bowl has the flange handles. I can't tell if it's a stainless or tinned bowl though - I own a modern tilt head Artisan with stainless bowl and the materials don't appear the same.

    If I sent you some photos of the mixer, would you be able to assist with determining an approximate age range?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Model K5 A Serial number 5B 01016 is what I got at an estate sale. I am thinking it is from the 40's from this blog. It was built by Velvet. (hand signed in pencil). I want to post my serial number to this and in hope of dating it. Thanks for your work on this blog!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have a K5-A workhorse that the switch on appears to be failing- it only goes to the highest speed. Anyone have a lead on parts for these monsters? Kitchenaid apparently doesn't bother with them and parts houses so far have "discontinued" next to the parts. Thanks- this machine will be with me until I die- & then the kids will fight over it!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I have a K5-A workhorse that the switch on appears to be failing- it only goes to the highest speed. Anyone have a lead on parts for these monsters? Kitchenaid apparently doesn't bother with them and parts houses so far have "discontinued" next to the parts. Thanks- this machine will be with me until I die- & then the kids will fight over it!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I bought my wife an vintage kitchen aide mixer, cause I remember my grandmothers growing up, I'm currently working on repairing it as there are some switch issues, I was on here looking for help with possibly dating it, it has a tinned bowl, has a serial number of 5B0116(7) or (1) hard to read last number

    ReplyDelete
  15. thank you Leolady for your information. i got my machine from the garage sale 7 years ago and love it. based on your info. mine is in the 70's because the Hobart logo is in shield and behind the speed control. i can't find the serial number anywhere. i would love to buy some attachments like meat grinder but i dont know if the one offerred in the market will fit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HI.
      I am sure that any "KitchenAid" attachment would work on your mixer.
      The hub where attachments are engaged is universal.
      The older grinders were made of metal. The new ones are not.
      Buy a new one for use now and then be on the look out for an affordable metal grinder.

      Delete
  16. I have my grandmothers K5-A mixer. The serial # is 5B14779 . My grandfather was a draftsman and worked in Troy. Is this mixer from the 40's? My bowls are tin if that makes any difference. It still runs like a champ. I know my dad took it to a repair place in Orlando, FL to change the cord out. Do I need to grease the gear box? Any information is greatly appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I have an old K5-A with serial number 5B2xxx and I have regressed it and replaced the gasket. I'm trying to figure out how to change the power cord. Does anyone have any idea?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Lots of good information on the K5-A in this Yahoo Group: We Actually Collect Electric Mixers (WACEM), including repairs and retrofits. You'll need to 'join' the group to view the archives. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/WACEM/info

    ReplyDelete
  19. I'm looking into buying a ka-5 off eBay. I was wondering if a new kitchenaid 6 qt bowl would fit into this mixer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, you need the narrow 5 qt bowl for a bowl lift mixer, the 6 qt bowl is larger in diameter and height and will not fit.

      Delete
  20. I just purchased a k5-a from a garage sale with the whisk, beater, dough hook, meat grinder, original push stick for the grinder and both tinned mixing bowls for 50$, the serial number is 5b08507, placing it in the early 40's if im not mistaken. A killer find

    ReplyDelete
  21. I have a k45sswh - the serial number is W83843159
    Cannot find out when it was made. It is not a classic. It doesn't say classic on the metal piece like the new ones. Anyone know anything ?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hi. So I am having trouble finding the colors available for sale on this model. I believe I have a 70's model K5-a(no serial number and logo in shield behind speed control). Now mine is yellow and I can't find any that color or any info on the color. People who see it always fall in love with it. I was curious if it was rare or what but I'd like a list of the original colors for the k5-a up until the end of the 70's. Also...what is the k5-ab difference to the k5-a? If any...thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete